FORECAST NL

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Newfoundland and Labrador is currently facing a series of pressing economic and social issues that will have both short and long-term consequences. These include substantial provincial debt, a declining and aging population, and the local and global effects of COVID-19. The effects of these social and economic threats will be worsened by the deepening climate emergency and its anticipated effects on oceans, coastal areas, health, and infrastructure. We need to be thoughtful, collaborative, and innovative in our development of solutions. Creative and practical solutions already exist, but they can't be adapted and brought to scale without a balanced approach and open dialogue--which brings us to the reason you are here!

Got ideas? Don't just sit in the back row!
Register Now to be part of the conversation.
Click on "Discussions" below to introduce yourself, take part in post-session conversations, share materials, and much more.


Newfoundland and Labrador is currently facing a series of pressing economic and social issues that will have both short and long-term consequences. These include substantial provincial debt, a declining and aging population, and the local and global effects of COVID-19. The effects of these social and economic threats will be worsened by the deepening climate emergency and its anticipated effects on oceans, coastal areas, health, and infrastructure. We need to be thoughtful, collaborative, and innovative in our development of solutions. Creative and practical solutions already exist, but they can't be adapted and brought to scale without a balanced approach and open dialogue--which brings us to the reason you are here!

Got ideas? Don't just sit in the back row!
Register Now to be part of the conversation.
Click on "Discussions" below to introduce yourself, take part in post-session conversations, share materials, and much more.

  • Read the Brief: Petroculture

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    Click here to access the PDF.



  • Read the Brief: Climate and Health

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    How will climate change impact our physical and mental health? This short brief takes you through some of the key concerns and provides a list of sources in case you're interested in learning more. Click here to view these images as a PDF.

  • Read the brief: A Just Transition

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    Click here to access the PDF


  • Helpful Link! Check out "Climatlantic"

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    CLIMAtlantic facilitates access to data and information that supports adaptation to climate change in Atlantic Canada through collaboration, networking, and partnerships.

    "We are user-driven, focusing on the needs of Indigenous communities, academia, provincial governments, municipalities, local service districts, non-profits, industry, and land-owners. CLIMAtlantic works with all regional and local groups to ensure there is a strong network of collaboration, and data and tools are easily accessible. CLIMAtlantic was created in partnership with the Canadian Centre for Climate Services (CCCS), all Atlantic Canada’s Provincial governments, and the support from the Ecology Action Centre, New Brunswick Environmental Network (NBEN), and Aster Group. The Canadian network of climate hubs in partnership with CCCS includes Ouranos (Quebec), the Pacific Climate Impacts Consortium (BC), and ClimateWest (Prairies). Regional climate data hubs support efforts to make all communities more resilient to extreme weather events."

    MISSION
    CLIMAtlantic’s mission is to provide those in Atlantic Canada with information and support to consider climate change impacts in their decisions. Driving this mission is the need for accessible, reliable, actionable climate information to address climate-related risks and support adaptation. These needs are informed by a wide range of key drivers such as:

    • social drivers – the impacts of climate change on communities and human health;
    • economic drivers – the impacts of climate change on the competitiveness of Atlantic Canadian economic sectors such as agriculture, energy, and insurance; and
    • environmental drivers – the impacts of climate change on ecosystems, species, and coasts; and the increasing threats to life and property from disasters due to climate-related severe events.

    The demand for climate services continues to grow within Canada and internationally, as well as in our region, so a constellation of players working together is important.


    Watch the video below and visit CLIMAtlantic's website to learn more!

    https://climatlantic.ca/




  • Read the Articles and Prepare for the Upcoming Session on Food and Farming

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    Rene Van Acker, Evan Fraser, and Lenore Newman's "5 technologies that will help make the food system carbon neutral" in The Conversation (18 May 2022)

    "Globally, about one-third of all greenhouse gas emissions come from agriculture and food systems. The carbon footprint of food systems includes all the emissions from its growing, processing, transportation and waste. Agriculture is also vulnerable to the effects of climate change and, as the conflict in Ukraine demonstrates, food systems can be exposed to geopolitics. Several technologies are already available that can help decarbonize the complex systems that link producers and consumers. These technologies can also make our food systems much more resilient to global threats. Here are five that we think show tremendous potential..."

    Read more here: https://theconversation.com/5-technologies-that-will-help-make-the-food-system-carbon-neutral-182846


    Julia Simon's "World Food Prize goes to former farmer who answers climate change question: 'So what?'" on NPR (5 May 2022)

    Scientist – and former farmer – Cynthia Rosenzweig was one of the first researchers making projections of how the changing climate would affect North American crops in the 1980s. She's the founder of the "Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project" or "AgMIP," a multi-disciplinary team of more than 1,000 researchers worldwide working on climate modeling and agriculture. Now Rosenzweig has won the World Food Prize for her work helping the global community recognize and predict climate change's effect on food systems and her leadership to give countries new solutions to ease the impact. NPR's Julia Simon interviews Rosenzweig, who explains why tackling the climate crisis and food requires new approaches to research, fields a question from a worried farmer in Nigeria and tells how she keeps her own eco-anxiety at bay.

    Read the full interview: https://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2022/05/05/1096797684/world-food-prize-goes-to-former-farmer-who-answers-climate-change-question-so-wh

  • What is a Just Transition (in Canada)?

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    "Climate change is happening now, changing our communities and our economy. It has prompted a global economic shift. Canada’s future success hinges on our ability to compete in an increasingly green, low-carbon global economy. We want to work with partners to ensure that the transition to a net-zero economy is done in a way that creates new opportunities for Canadian workers and their communities – providing sustainable jobs for Canadians in every region. The Canadians who built our current energy systems have the know-how and innovative ideas to create a prosperous, low-carbon future."

    The federal government is planning for the future, and they want Canadians to provide feedback and stay informed of the ongoing process of transition. Read more here: https://www.rncanengagenrcan.ca/en/collections/just-transition; and more here: https://www.rncanengagenrcan.ca/en/content/canadas-actions-support-workers-and-communities

    Read the Harris Centre's one-pager on the topic of Just Transition to help clarify the issues and provide some further information!

  • Read the Article: Climate Buzzwords

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    From The New York Times | By Catrin Einhorn, Christopher Flavelle, Hiroko Tabuchi, Brad Plumer and Winston Choi-Schagrin

    Here’s a primer on some of the jargon you’re likely to hear a lot these days!


    Link to article:

    https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2021/10/31/climate/climate-change-sustainability-definition.html

  • Upcoming Session! Climate Change, Food, and Agriculture in NL

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    Make sure to join us at noon (12pm NT) on June 16th to hear from our special guests on the impacts of climate change on food and agriculture, not just in NL but globally. How will climate change impact food supply and food costs? Is there anything we can do, as individuals, to mitigate and adapt? Are there any opportunities?

    Click this link to register to attend (and receive the Zoom link the morning of the event): http://events.constantcontact.com/register/event?llr=nsixiugab&oeidk=a07ej8bne8jb33a2ffd



  • Communities & Infrastructure Session: Watch the Recording

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    On April 5th, 2022, we spoke with Drs. Kelly Vodden, Kathleen Parewick, and Joe Daraio about the ways communities can prepare for the various ways their infrastructure will be impacted by climate change.

    You can watch the recording of the session here:


  • Resources for Climate Change: Communities and Infrastructure

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    Click here to download the PDF

    Click here to download the PDF of the image below


Page last updated: 17 Aug 2022, 10:47 AM